The Purpose and Skills of a Common Law Sheriff

For over a thousand years in England, the traditional job of the Sheriff was to detain those harming others, bring them into local “shire” courts for judgment and enforce the sentence of those courts. In the United States, that tradition is still alive in locally elected Sheriffs who are answerable to the people through elections. Australia has no such tradition, since its police are all unaccountable private employees of the foreign corporation known as the Australian Government.

The Purpose and Skills of a Common Law Sheriff

The traditional role of the Sheriff in protecting the community and its courts was not performed alone, but alongside appointed Deputies and a vigilant populace. It was understood that everyone in the community had a responsibility to keep the peace and stop wrongdoers. Every citizen had the right to arrest and detain those who were a threat to their liberty and well-being. Policing was part of self-governance, not a power over people.

Accordingly, a Common Law Sheriff appointed by a Common Law Assembly can deputize anyone to assist him/her, including other police officers of the old regime of “Australia”. This is very important to do, especially in the early phase of our return to our Constitutional government, because it uses the strength of our adversary against itself. (See more details of this process in our Common Law Training Manual).

Generally, Commonwealth Sheriffs return power to the people by making them their own policing authorities, including by forming their own Militias. People must relearn their own inherent liberty and power, and elected and recallable Sheriffs are tutors and leaders in that process.